Useful Daily Living Information

Information on everyday life for foreign residents in Tokyo

If you are not familiar with the local community rules and systems where you are living, you may become overwhelmed by unfamiliar menial tasks in your daily life. By knowing and understanding the ins and outs beforehand, you will be able to navigate daily life in Japan more effectively and comfortably.

Below, we have gathered and assortment of information related to daily life in Japan, in English, covering such topics as how to discard garbage, or how to pay the bills. 

How to Donate and Sell Used Clothing and Furniture in Japan

Whether learning a new language, doing your best to follow the local culture, or just trying to get from point A to point B, living in Japan never ceases to keep expats on their toes. But what to do when your time in Tokyo has ended, you need to downsize to a smaller apartment, or you would like to…

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How to Use a Japanese Washing Machine

Japan’s future-tech society has created many solutions to keep a nation looking its best, but when you’re living in a foreign country sometimes even the simplest tasks like doing laundry can be difficult to understand. Have no fear, though — PLAZA HOMES is here to help you by walking you through th…

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English-speaking Hair-Salons in Tokyo

While Tokyo features an abundance of excellent salons, getting the ideal haircut can be a challenge if you don’t speak Japanese. Fortunately, there are a select few salons staffed with stylists who have either worked in or completed professional hairdresser training in an English-speaking country,…

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Japanese Dry Cleaning and English-Speaking Dry Cleaning Services in Tokyo

One of the biggest challenges many Westerners in Tokyo face is the difference in living footprint. Space is the most expensive commodity in Tokyo, and engineers are always looking for ways to maximize living space. One vital appliance that often gets cut the earliest is laundry machines. Most apart…

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How to find the right laundry detergent in Japan

Finding detergents for laundry in Japan can be quite the challenge, especially for those who are unable to read Japanese. Here is a great guide to shop laundry detergents in Japan. Main keywords you should know when buying laundry detergent in Japan 洗濯 Sentaku Laundry / Washing 粉末 Funmatsu (…

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How to Keep Cool and Use your Japanese Air Conditioner

We’re not sure how summer is where you’re from, but here in Tokyo, it’s HOT. The average peak temperature in the summer is around 30 C. Besides that, it’s also humid. So, get ready, temperatures are set to start climbing and they won’t stop until sometime in September. The question is: how do you…

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The expiration date on food products in Japan

In Japan, the expiration date and the consumption date are determined based on the JAS Law and the Food Sanitation Law. While in Japan, have you ever wondered where the expiration date on food products are?Here we will explain what the dates on food products in Japan mean. There are usually 2 diff…

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How to Read Japanese Nutrition Labels

When living in a foreign country like Japan, knowing how to read the nutrition facts label is important, especially for those with dietary restrictions or allergies.

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Allergies in Japan: How to Read Japanese Food Labels

Japan has a diverse food culture that enjoys experimenting with a variety of ingredients with a strong emphasis on soy, wheat, fish, and shellfish. It just so happens that these four ingredients are included in the group of eight foods that account for 90 percent of all food-allergic reactions.

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Pick the right fish for your dish - How to read seafood labels in Japan

Expats in Japan often shop at local supermarkets. But unfortunately, the food labels are not in English. Seafood labels are especially difficult to understand and select for your particular dish. You often see the lables of "生食用" (for raw food), "刺身用" (for sashimi), "加熱用" (for heating), "焼き魚用" (for…

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