Join a Japanese Pottery Class in Tokyo

Poste date: Monday, February 5, 2018

Japanese Pottery (Tougei) is popular throughout the world.

Arita-yaki, Kutani-yaki, Mashiko-yaki, are just three types of Japanese ceramics.

Arita yaki is made in and around the town of Arita in Saga Prefecture. It is known for is elegantly painted designs with colors such as indigo, red, yellow and gold.

Kutani-yaki is made in the southern cities of Kanazawa, Komatsu, Kaga, and Nomi in Ishikawa Prefecture. Kutani Yaki comes in many forms using vivid colors like blue, green, and yellow.

Mashiko-yaki is from Tochigi Prefecture. The soil of Mashiko is very rich and is easy to shape. Mashiko yaki is known for both its beauty and practicality.

Japanese Pottery is becoming more and more popular regardless of age or gender.

People enjoy decorating their dining area with the dishes and flower vase they have created on their own.

You can even gift your art piece to someone special to you.

What is fascinating about Japanese Pottery?

  • Kneading the clay has a heeling and relaxation effect
  • You can create your original art piece.
  • Concentrating in creating your art piece can help you relieve stress.

And many more benefits!!

Making Japanese Pottery is an amazing experience to have during your stay in Japan!

In Tokyo, there are some Japanese Pottery classes available in English. Trial classes are suitable for beginners.


Japanese Pottery (Tougei) Classes in English

Uzumako Ceramic Art School

No experience is needed to be creative and enjoy pottery classes at Uzumako. Beginners and intermediate / advanced students are encouraged to use our school to be creative through a range of techniques including handbuilding, sculpting, and wheel throwing. If you are interested in Japanese culture and crafts, please visit us and learn about Japanese pottery making techniques.

Tel : 03-6809-6363
Address : 3-29-11, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo
Website : http://www.uzumakotougei.com/en/index.html


SHIROGANE CERAMIC ART SCHOOL

We pride ourselves on being the flexible ceramics school, while providing the most hands on demonstrations. We are prepared for everyone from begginners, intermediate to advanced levels who like ceramic art, offering very interesting and special courses.

Tel : 050-3560-5417
Address : 5-13-4, Shirogane, Minato-ku, Tokyo
Website : http://www.sirokanetougei.com/en/home.html

  • The Latest Modern Japanese Bathrooms

    Japanese people love taking baths and as a result bathrooms in Japan have many high-tech features to simplify the bathing process. You can find everything from baths that automatically fill up to baths that self clean in Japan. Here are some of the latest modern Japanese bathrooms and their advanced technologies.
  • Japanese Calligraphy (Shodo) classes in Tokyo

    Shodo is a form of Japanese calligraphy—using a traditional brush “Fude” and ink “Sumi”—with a 4000-year old history. Children throughout Japan learn the basics of calligraphy in Elementary School. Here we have created a list of English-Speaking Shodo schools in Tokyo.
  • What you didn’t know about Japanese habits

    Japanese people always say "Sumimasen (Excuse me / I’m sorry)" and you hear Sumimasen everywhere. But did you know that there are many meanings in Sumimasen? It's not always used for apologies.
  • Tokyo Ninja Experiences: Learn the ways of the Shinobi

    Tokyo has lots to offer when it comes to Ninja themed experiences. While traditionally ninja clans are said to be from Iga and Koga, authentic ninja lessons and experiences can be found in Tokyo. Here are some of your best options for a Tokyo Ninja Experience.
  • Japanese Office Documents

    If you have ever worked in a Japanese company, you may have had the experience of being overwhelmed by any in-house documents that you have had to submit on different occasions. Here we cover a few of the most common documents you will need to know and provide some vocabulary that will help you when it comes time to fill them out.
  • Restaurant Etiquette in Japan: How to Avoid Serious Faux Pas

    Japanese restaurant etiquette can vary greatly from the customs of your home country. Here are some essential points to watch out for to ensure that you enjoy the best meal possible while avoiding any serious faux pas.